Thursday, December 21, 2006

Leukemia Patient Fights Cancer With Japanese Mythology

Leukemia Patient Fights Cancer With Japanese Mythology

After being diagnosed with leukemia, 25-year-old Michael Nelson campaigns for treatment funds using a clever website and the famous story of Sadako and the 1000 Paper Cranes. In the story of Sadako, a young Japanese girl attempts to fight her leukemia by following an ancient legend claiming to cure all illness by folding 1000 paper cranes. If Michael can sell 10,000 small website advertisements in the shape of a paper crane, he will have enough money to afford the cure for his cancer.

Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) November 19, 2005

After being diagnosed with leukemia, 25-year-old Michael Nelson campaigns for treatment funds using a clever website and the famous story of Sadako and the 1000 Paper Cranes. In the story of Sadako, a young Japanese girl attempts to fight her leukemia by following an ancient legend claiming to cure all illness by folding 1000 paper cranes. If Michael can sell 10,000 small website advertisements in the shape of a paper crane, he will have enough money to afford the cure for his cancer.

Michael John Nelson, otherwise known as MJ, is a 25-year-old ex-boxer who now spends his time battling a relentless opponent known for punching below the belt. Apparently, nobody told him that MJ left the ring almost eleven months ago when he was diagnosed with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML). Since January of 2005 MJ has faced a daily bout with cancer. This kid has shown some serious endurance, but it appears that the eye of the tiger may be in the opponent’s corner this round.

The only known cure for CML is by way of stemcell treatment. Unfortunately, most of the research and treatment options for stemcell technology have been outlawed in the United States. The only available options for stemcell treatment at this point are extremely expensive and most medical insurance companies will not cover the procedures.

While there is no other known cure for CML, there are curative measures that may be taken to prolong the life of a patient. One of these methods includes a drug called Gleevec that can help bring the cancer into remission where it can be held at bay for years at a time. This is usually accompanied by a bone marrow transplant which requires a suitable donor and has a failure rate of about 25% for those who are in the remission stages of their cancer. As far as we know, MJ has never been in remission. The doctors have never been able to bring his infected white blood cell count below 26.7% and they currently reside at 66.9% making his chances of success even worse. Although MJ has been on Gleevec for the past few months, he has recently been taken off of it by his doctor who feels the drug is not helping at this point. He is scheduled to undergo a bone marrow transplant in December and begins chemotherapy in a few days in preparation for the surgery. The life expectancy of a leukemia bone marrow transplant survivor is still only a handful of years at best. But with a world full of bad news, MJ has somehow found a gem of hope.

As if delivered by angels, a local Minnesota business owner named Jaime Gehly decides to put all operations on hold to help raise the money for MJ to receive the stemcell treatment he so desperately wants. Mr. Gehly runs an online custom computer and hardware company called Q & N Retail and Services. The funding necessary for MJ’s stemcell treatment ranges from $800,000 to $1.4 million. In order to begin the initial testing to discover if MJ will be eligible for the full procedure it will cost $25,000 with a required credit limit of at least $250,000. With the help of Gehly and his business, MJ feels he now has a good shot at raising this money.

“We’ve got a long way to go, but Jaime and his company, Q&N, have put together this ingenious website that will probably be copied by people in these situations for years to come,” states MJ on his newly found motivation to fight his cancer.

The website is themed after the true story of a young Japanese girl who survived the World War II bombing of Hiroshima only to extract Leukemia from the radiation 10 years later. The story was published years ago in a popular book called Sadako and the 1000 Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr. The story tells of a 12-year-old girl who attempts to restore her health by folding 1000 origami paper cranes. She had gotten the idea from an ancient Japanese legend that promised to cure all illness for whoever could accomplish this feat. www. TenThousandPaperCranes. com is Jaime Gehly’s modern day version of the tale.

“The website has a grid of 10,000 small squares. Inside each square is a little drawing of a paper crane. For every $80 donation we receive, that person gets to take down one of the cranes and replace it with their own advertisement and website link. If we sell all 10,000 paper cranes, we will have the $800,000 for MJ,” explains Gehly.

Gehly also admits that the idea for the website was not entirely of his own design. He claims to have gotten the idea off of a site called MillionDollarHomePage. com, “I can’t take credit for the idea. A guy named Alex Tew from the UK thought up the idea to raise money for college. I thought it was so clever that I purchased $200 worth of ad space for Q & N. He launched just over 3 months ago and already has earned over $500,000.”

While Gehly’s version has slight similarities to the predecessors website, the additional themed reference towards Coerr’s novel and a far more serious and urgent objective seem to carry a greater level of public interest. Online statistics show that the majority of those who have purchased advertising space on Alex Tew’s Million Dollar Home Page have more than doubled their website traffic due to the extensive media coverage on his plight. If that kind of return can be expected from MJ’s Ten Thousand Paper Cranes then I doubt there will be any problem raising the necessary funds. In addition, Gehly has stated that the purchased ad space will remain online for another five years, once placed on the site. Already, the website is showing signs of some heavy movements in site traffic.

To help increase public awareness of his efforts, Gehly has teamed up with another hard-hitter in the pixel market, the Million Quarter Web Page, in which pixels can be purchased for 25 cents each. This partnership appears to be paying off as both sites have begun to see immense improvement in site traffic, “I contacted them early on in my campaign and we decided we could help each other out. If you purchase pixels on the Million Quarter Web Page tell them, ‘Ten Thousand Paper Cranes sent me,’ and they’ll give you additional free pixels with your order.”

Million Quarter Web Page is located at http://www. MillionQuarterWebPage. com (http://www. MillionQuarterWebPage. com) and also offers a bonus pixel promotion for referred donations to Ten Thousand Paper Cranes. Having spent the last three weeks as a featured ‘Mover and Shaker’ on Alexa. com’s traffic ranking website, it seems as though the buddy system is paying off for these two advertising pioneers.

With the help of Q & N Retail and Services, M. J. Nelson seems to be in good hands, for the time being. Although with the deadline fast approaching and MJ’s health rapidly declining, it’s hard to say how long they will have to raise these funds. It’s going to take a lot of help and some serious pixel mania to reach their goal, but mix that with a solid game-plan and a bit of luck and perhaps MJ will end up receiving the medical attention he so desperately desires.

To donate money to the M. J. Nelson Leukemia Fund and receive your own ad space visit http://www. TenThousandPaperCranes. com (http://www. TenThousandPaperCranes. com). In addition, you can email Donations@CranesForCancer. com for link-swap requests and any other inquiries. For more information and updates from Q & N Retail and Services visit http://www. Qnretail. com (http://www. Qnretail. com).

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