Sunday, February 14, 2010

TWO-THIRDS IN SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT REPORT PHYSICAL, SEXUAL OR EMOTIONAL ABUSE DURING CHILDHOOD

TWO-THIRDS IN SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT REPORT PHYSICAL, SEXUAL OR EMOTIONAL ABUSE DURING CHILDHOOD

(PRWEB) February 18, 2000

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: February 15, 2000

Contact: Leah R. Young

Phone: 301-443-5052

TWO-THIRDS IN SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT REPORT PHYSICAL, SEXUAL OR EMOTIONAL ABUSE DURING CHILDHOOD

NEW GUIDE OFFERS WAYS TO BREAK THE CYCLE

Breaking the cycle of substance abuse among adults who suffered abuse and neglect in childhood is the focus of a new best treatment practices guide released today by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT).

The publication, Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Child Abuse And Neglect Issues, is the 36th in a series of Treatment Improvement Protocols published by CSAT. It offers guidance to substance abuse treatment counselors and other providers in identifying and treating

Adults with alcohol or drug abuse addictions who are survivors of

Childhood physical, sexual or other abuse or neglect. This new guide warns that, failure to treat both problems puts children of these patients at risk for abuse and neglect, and eventual self-medication with alcohol or drugs.

"While not all victims of childhood abuse and neglect become substance abusers, the relationship is clear," SAMHSA Administrator Nelba Chavez, Ph. D., said. "It is critically important that professionals who treat substance abuse in adults recognize the signs of prior childhood neglect and abuse. With estimates of as many as two thirds of all those in substance abuse treatment reporting that they were physically, sexually or emotionally abused during childhood, we must focus on treating these

Adults who are raising the next generation of children."

CSAT Director H. Westley Clark, M. D., J. D., M. P.H., explained that "TIP 36

Will help alcohol and drug treatment providers work more effectively with adults with histories of childhood abuse or neglect, and adults who abuse, or are at risk of abusing, their own children. Without proper screening and assessment of their patients, counselors may wrongly attribute symptoms of childhood trauma-related disorders to the consequences of

Current substance abuse. Understanding and treating the root causes of clients' symptoms will greatly increase the effectiveness of substance abuse treatment."

Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 36 points out that screening substance abusers for childhood abuse or neglect can have the following benefits:

Stopping the cycle: TIP 36 highlights research indicating that, while adults who were abused or neglected in their childhoods do not always abuse their own children, they are at greater risk for doing so.

Decreasing the probability of relapse:

Many substance abusers consume substances to self-medicate post-traumatic stress symptom related to childhood physical or sexual abuse or other trauma.

Improving a client's overall psychological and interpersonal functioning:

Childhood sexual abuse and neglect may affect the individual's self-concept, sense of self-esteem and ability to self-actualize.

Improving program outcome: Screening for a history of child abuse or neglect will help a program determine the needs of a client and thus improve substance abuse treatment outcomes.

The report documents the association between one form of abuse, sexual abuse, and depression, anxiety, sexual dysfunction, eating disorders,

Personality disorders, dissociative disorders and substance abuse.

Treatment Improvement Protocols are an integral part of CSAT's determination to bridge the gap between research and the needs and practices of treatment professionals and administrators. TIPS are

Developed by consensus panels of non-federal experts to provide best practices guidance to clinicians, program administrators and payers. Judy Howard, M. D., Professor of Pediatrics at the School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, chaired the consensus panel for

TIP 36.

The Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) is a component of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). SAMHSA, a public health agency within the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the lead federal agency for improving access to quality substance abuse prevention, addiction treatment and mental health services in the U. S. Publications are often available at www. samhsa. gov or on

Www. health. org. They can be ordered by contacting SAMHSA's National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI) at 1-800-729-6686; TDD for hearing impaired, 1-800-487-4889. News media requests for

Information on SAMHSA's substance abuse and mental health services programs should be directed to Media Services at 1-800-487-4890.

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