Friday, July 30, 2010

New York City Council Bill on Electronics Recycling

New York City Council Bill on Electronics Recycling

INFORM, a national, non-profit research organization, commends the sponsors of the New York City bill on Electronics Recycling, Michael McMahon, Gifford Miller and Bill de Blasio for proposing an approach that compels involvement of manufacturers of electronic devices in end-of-life management.

(PRWEB) May 27, 2005

INFORM, a national, non-profit research organization, commends the sponsors of the New York City bill on Electronics Recycling, Michael McMahon, Gifford Miller and Bill de Blasio for proposing an approach that compels involvement of manufacturers of electronic devices in end-of-life management. Residents of New York City clearly need an environmentally responsible way to recycle the millions of electronic devices they have stored away and those that they will take out of service in the coming years. Without New York state legislation in place, the electronics recycling bill will make New York City both a state and a national leader in addressing human and environmental health, and will help create a standard for other major municipalities to follow.

INFORM supports the type of legislation put forward by the City Council today – measures that shift the financial burden away from municipalities and the consumer toward the producers of electronic devices for the management of those electronics at their end of life – a practice known as Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR).

For over 10 years INFORM has been an advocate of EPR in the US. INFORM’s research has found that when taxpayers pay for waste management and recycling, business has little incentive to invest in less wasteful and more recyclable products. Public policy that addresses end-of-life management helps divert products from landfills and incinerators, reduce the environmental burden of material extraction through material recycling that follows environmentally sound guidelines, and eliminate hazardous content from products. Such legislation also serves another purpose: it helps create the economic incentive for producers to change their practices – such as designing out toxic materials used during manufacturing, and creating system changes, such as developing more efficient ways of recycling.

We look forward to the implementation of the New York City Electronics Recycling bill, and the positive health and environmental benefits it will confer on the city and all its residents for years to come.

About INFORM. INFORM is a national, non-profit research and outreach organization that examines the effects of business practices, technologies, and products on the environment and human health. For 30 years INFORM has sought practical solutions to the environmental challenges of safeguarding ecosystems from toxic chemicals, shifting to pollution-free transportation, and preventing solid waste.

INFORM Materials Promoting Waste Prevention and Design of Less Wasteful Products

Reports

Calling All Cell Phones: Collection, Reuse and Recycling Programs in the US Eric Most (2003)

Waste in the Wireless World: The Challenge of Cell Phones

Bette K. Fishbein (2002)

Leasing: A Step Toward Producer Responsibility

Bette Fishbein (INFORM), Lorraine S. McGarry (Duke University, Nicholas School of the Environment), and Patricia S. Dillon (Tufts University, The Gordon Institute)(2000)

Extended Producer Responsibility: A Materials Policy for the 21st Century Bette Fishbein (INFORM), John Ehrenfeld (MIT), and John Young (Materials Efficiency Project) (2000)

Fact sheets

European Union Electrical and Electronic Products Directives

The WEEE and RoHS Directives: Highlights and Analysis

Impact of the RoHS Directive on Electronic Products Sold in the US

The Basel Convention and its Mobile Phone Partnership Initiative (MPPI)

Cell Phones: A Poster Child for EPR

Electric Appliance Recycling in Japan

PC Recycling in Japan

What are Rechargeable Batteries?

Waste Reduction Tips for the Office

For further information, please contact Amy Scott: 212-361-2400 ext.228 or www. informinc. org

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