Wednesday, October 13, 2010

New Requirements and Tips for Driving to Mexico for Spring Break

New Requirements and Tips for Driving to Mexico for Spring Break

Beginning March 1, 2010 U. S. citizens are required to present a valid U. S. passport in order to enter Mexico. International Insurance Group, Inc. (IIG) has created a list of the latest requirements and tips to help make any 2010 Mexico Spring Break vacation a breeze.

Flagstaff, Ariz. (PRWEB) March 10, 2010

As vacationers prepare for Spring Break they must beware of several changes that have taken place in Mexico entry/exit and U. S. re-entry requirements in the course of the past year. International Insurance Group, Inc. (IIG) has created a list of the latest requirements and tips to help make any 2010 Mexico Spring Break vacation a breeze.

Obtain & Carry Correct Identification

--Land travelers must have a valid U. S. passport or a U. S. citizenship document accompanied by acceptable photo identification, such as a state or military issued ID. A passport or passport card is the best method of providing this information.

--Beginning on June 1, 2009 all U. S. citizens are required to present a passport book, passport card or WHTI-compliant (http://www. dhs. gov/files/crossingborders/travelers. shtm) document when entering or re-entering the United States.

--Beginning on March 1, 2010 all U. S. citizens are required to present a valid U. S. passport in order to enter Mexico. This does not apply to the Baja region of Mexico.

--Pets must have a health certificate to be able to pass into Mexico. Click here to see where to get a health certificate (http://www. aphis. usda. gov/animal_health/area_offices/).

For further questions on entry requirements go to the Embassy of Mexico website (http://portal. sre. gob. mx/usa/) or call the embassy at (202) 736-1000.

Special Requirements for Children

--Mexican law requires any non-Mexican citizen under the age of 18 to carry notarized written permission from a parent or guardian, not traveling with the child, to or from Mexico. This includes children traveling with only one parent. This permission must include the name of the parent, the name of the child, the name of anyone traveling with the child, and the notarized signature(s) of the absent parent(s). The U. S. State Department recommends the permission include travel dates, destinations and a brief summary of the circumstances surrounding the travel. The child must be carrying the original letter – not a facsimile or scanned copy – as well as proof of the parent/child relationship (usually a birth certificate or court document) – and an original custody decree, if applicable. Contact the Mexican Embassy or closest Mexican Consulate for more information.

--A similar letter allowing the person bringing the child into Mexico to make medical decisions for the child in the event of a medical emergency is also a good idea.

Auto Insurance and Licenses

--The U. S. State Department and IIG strongly recommends purchasing a full coverage auto insurance policy that will cover the cost of bail. If you are involved in an automobile accident in Mexico, you will be taken into police custody until it is determined who is at fault and whether you have the ability to pay any penalty.

--American citizens planning on driving to Mexico should carry a valid driver’s license at all times. U. S. driver’s licenses are valid in Mexico.

--Mexican law requires that vehicles be driven only by their owners, or that the owner be inside the vehicle. If not, the car may be seized by Mexican customs and will not be returned under any circumstances.

Vehicle Importation Permit

--Those traveling outside the Free or border Zone (defined as the an area between 20 and 30 kilometers from the border with the U. S.) with a vehicle must obtain a temporary import permit or risk having the vehicle confiscated by Mexican customs officials. At present, the only exceptions to the requirement are travel in the Baja Peninsula, and in the state of Sonora, only for vehicles entering through the Nogales port of entry.

--The Vehicle Importation Permit can be purchased at the Mexico border, Mexico Tourism offices or online on through the Banjercito Website (http://www. banjercito. com. mx/site/imagenes/iitv/instruccionesIITV. html).

Register with the U. S. Embassy or Consulate

--If planning to stay in Mexico for more than a weekend, IIG recommends registering with the U. S. or Canadian Embassy nearest one's destination. The latest regional travel information is provided to those who register, and it allows the embassy to provide assistance in the event of an emergency.

U. S. State Department Website

--IIG recommends checking the U. S. State Department website (http://travel. state. gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis_pa_tw_1168.html) for the latest international travel information anytime one travels abroad.

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