Friday, June 3, 2011

Stroke Recovery and Caregiving: A Job No One Asks For

Stroke Recovery and Caregiving: A Job No One Asks For

Striking suddenly and without warning, a stroke often alters a person’s cognitive ability, speech, and emotions. When a loved one survives a stroke, it affects the entire family, especially the person who finds her/himself in the sudden position of becoming a caregiver. Understanding the challenges that will be faced and equipping oneself with invaluable information can make a world of difference.

Kissimmee, Fl (PRWEB) September 9, 2006

Striking suddenly and without warning, a stroke often alters a person’s cognitive ability, speech, and emotions. When a loved one survives a stroke, it affects the entire family — especially the person who finds her/himself in the sudden position of becoming a caregiver.

Unlike with progressive degenerative diseases such as MS, Alzheimer’s, or Parkinson’s, stroke survivor caregivers are often thrust into the position of caregiving with little or no warning. Overnight, the caregiver may be thrown into a full-time job he or she did not ask for, was not trained for, and has no end date. When a loved one becomes disabled, many decisions have to be made; one of those decisions is whether a family member should provide the needed care or whether the family should look for outside assistance.

The choices can be difficult unless you know what to consider. Providing homecare for a stroke survivor can be deeply satisfying as well as uniquely challenging. Understanding those challenges and equipping oneself with invaluable information can make a world of difference. When making this important decision, Maria M. Meyer, publisher of the award-winning series The Comfort of Home™, recommends that you consider the following factors:

? Can you manage the role of caregiver along with your other responsibilities?

? Is the stroke survivor willing to have an outside caregiver in the home?

? Is the environment safe and supportive and does it allow for some independence?

? Is there a hospital emergency unit nearby?

? How accessible is the home if walkers and wheelchairs are used?

? Is their enough room for items such as wheelchair, walker, bedside toilet, and lift?

? Is a doctor, nurse, or specialist available to supervise care when needed?

? Is money available to hire additional help?

Written with the expertise of Jon Caswell, lead editor and feature writer of the American Stroke Association’s Stroke Connection Magazine, The Comfort of Home™ Stroke Edition: A Guide for Stroke Caregivers, helps caregivers, family members, and stroke survivors, understand the day-to-day issues confronted by caregivers. This book will guide readers through every caregiving stage from explaining different kinds of stroke, to understanding personality changes.

Other important topics include, understanding the causes of stroke and how to prevent a recurrent stroke, arranging the home to make it safe and comfortable, purchasing equipment, travel, therapies, working with your healthcare team, activities of daily living, and returning to work after a stroke. In addition, chapters are filled with special notes, and tips, that alert readers to important issues that can make life easier for all concerned, with special emphasis on how to prevent caregiver burnout.

The road to recovery is difficult for everyone involved, understanding the challenges can help the caregiver, stroke survivor, and family members claim their lives once again.

Download A FREE Sample Chapter: Driving After A Stroke

Http://comfortofhome. com/bk/st/Stroke_Driving_Excerpt. pdf (http://comfortofhome. com/bk/st/Stroke_Driving_Excerpt. pdf)

The Comfort of Home™ Stroke Edition: A Guide for Stroke Caregivers, will be available January 2007 in quality trade paperback at a retail price of $24.95. It is published by CareTrust Publications, distributed by PGW and is available through Amazon. com, BarnesandNoble. com, and all major bookstores.

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